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The Best Computer Security Posters You Will See Today

Because even in the late eighties it was important to secure your data… here are six wonderful ways to remind your coworkers and associates. Images courtesy Vanguard Marketing Services. I couldn’t find them on the internet, so maybe they didn’t follow their own advice.

Finding a Good Password Is Just a Roll of the Dice

Never have secure account passwords been more important, yet never have they been harder for humans to remember. Think of all of the times you have had to make a password that had a certain number of special characters, numbers, upper case, lower case, DNA samples, and a map to the One Ring. We’re all creatures of habit; I would bet money you put your upper case letter at the beginning of the dictionary words you used, replaced a couple of letters with typical numbers or special characters (@ for a, 3 for e, etc), and maybe finished it up with some numbers (like a special year) and punctuation. If I figured you out, don’t feel bad.

Ashley Madison Breach - Another Study in Security and Mitigation

So you’ve probably heard a little bit about Ashley Madison and the massive data breach, but may have been wondering a few things. Namely, who is Ashley, why do I care that her data is all over the internet, and why does this matter to me? If this is you, you should absolutely care because it’s yet another important lesson in safeguarding your personal information and why we all need to assume that our private data becoming public is a matter of when, not if.

Switching Hosts

So between random hiccups with my ISP, the struggles of de-conflicting my VPN server with my web server, and a desire for more robust uptime, I finally decided to bite the bullet and get a real web host. I searched around a bit, and I narrowed down what I really needed:

  1. SSH access.
  2. A static IP address.
  3. Nothing else.

How to Mount a CB Radio Into a MINI - Part 2

So yesterday, I discussed the ins and outs of picking the parts for a CB radio installation. Today, I want to talk about the troubles of actually slamming all of those bits into a small car. A very small car. A MINI. It was surprisingly smooth, though like choosing hardware, it went in steps:

  1. Plan your radio and antenna locations
  2. Consult as many resources as possible on how to remove interior panels and access the battery through the firewall

How to Mount a CB Radio Into a MINI - Part 1

So before I went cross country on a recent road trip, I decided to engage in a little hillbilly fun and install a CB (Citizen’s Band) Radio. Why?

  1. I don’t yet have an amateur radio license.
  2. I wanted to see how difficult radio installation was on my own before attempting anything more complicated.
  3. I want to get my amateur radio license and run a mobile station; I figured that this would be a good test run.
  4. It’s funny.

So, just what are the primary parts for a mobile radio setup and what did I use?

New and Improved With SSL - Update

Alright, so it took some tooling around and a better understanding of Nginx, my web server application, but I got some issues sorted out. I was getting frustrated that running my site through Qualys’ excellent SSL Labs tool kept showing that I still supported SSLv3, despite removing that from my SSL information in my server blocks. Possibly due to some of my redirection shenanigans, some ways a user might probe my site after setting up ssl still resulted in offering SSLv3 services.

New and Improved With SSL

FINALLY. After months of intermittently pounding my head and trying to figure this out, I finally got SSL (Secure Socket Layers) working on nginx (this blog’s web server) alongside the SSL-based OpenVPN Access Server. It was quite an adventure and took a bit of trial and error since most of the sites I found out there are pretty good at detailing some of the steps, but there was always something lacking.

Sad Day for Linux

Philip Newborough (aka corenominal) announced Friday that CrunchBang Linux (aka #!) is no longer going to be actively developed. It’s a sad day for fans of the Openbox window manager. Mr. Newborough suggested that users would get the best out of just operating plain old Debian, the foundation of many popular Linux distros these days. I’ll consider it eventually, Mr. Newborough, but let me just revel in my slick lightweight custom environment for a little longer.